33. Toronto Planning Review Panel II
33. Toronto Planning Review Panel II
32. Toronto Pearson Residents’ Reference Panel on Airport Growth and Noise Fairness
32. Toronto Pearson Residents’ Reference Panel on Airport Growth and Noise Fairness
31. Metrolinx Residents’ Reference Panel on the Regional Transportation Plan
31. Metrolinx Residents’ Reference Panel on the Regional Transportation Plan
30. Duncan-North Cowichan Citizens’ Assembly on Municipal Amalgamation
30. Duncan-North Cowichan Citizens’ Assembly on Municipal Amalgamation
29. City of Lethbridge Citizens’ Assembly on Councillor Employment and Compensation
29. City of Lethbridge Citizens’ Assembly on Councillor Employment and Compensation
28. Citizens’ Reference Panel on Pharmacare in Canada
28. Citizens’ Reference Panel on Pharmacare in Canada
27. St. Michael’s Hospital: Residents Health Services Panel
27. St. Michael’s Hospital: Residents Health Services Panel
26. St. Michael’s Hospital: Academic Family Health Team Patient Design Session
26. St. Michael’s Hospital: Academic Family Health Team Patient Design Session
25. Toronto Planning Review Panel
25. Toronto Planning Review Panel
24. Calgary Commission on Municipal Infrastructure
24. Calgary Commission on Municipal Infrastructure
23. The Citizens’ Reference Panel on the Mental Health Action Plan for Canada
23. The Citizens’ Reference Panel on the Mental Health Action Plan for Canada
22. Metrolinx Residents’ Reference Panel on the Davenport Community Rail Overpass
22. Metrolinx Residents’ Reference Panel on the Davenport Community Rail Overpass
21. Halton Region Citizens’ Reference Panel on Strategic Priorities
21. Halton Region Citizens’ Reference Panel on Strategic Priorities
20. Grandview-Woodland Citizens’ Assembly
20. Grandview-Woodland Citizens’ Assembly
19. St. Joseph’s Health Centre Community Reference Panel
19. St. Joseph’s Health Centre Community Reference Panel
18. Residents’ Reference Panel on Supervised Injection Services
18. Residents’ Reference Panel on Supervised Injection Services
17. BC Services Card User Panel on Digital Services
17. BC Services Card User Panel on Digital Services
16. Metrolinx Regional Residents’ Reference Panel on Transportation Investment
16. Metrolinx Regional Residents’ Reference Panel on Transportation Investment
15. Ontario Ministry of Consumer Services Reference Panel on the Condominium Act
15. Ontario Ministry of Consumer Services Reference Panel on the Condominium Act
14. Calgary Arts Development Citizens’ Reference Panel
14. Calgary Arts Development Citizens’ Reference Panel
13. Toronto Residents’ Reference Panel on Household Income
13. Toronto Residents’ Reference Panel on Household Income
12. Citizens’ Reference Panel on Ontario Health Services
12. Citizens’ Reference Panel on Ontario Health Services
11. TCHC Tenant Communications Strategy & Tenants’ Reference Panel
11. TCHC Tenant Communications Strategy & Tenants’ Reference Panel
10. Ottawa Hospital Patients' Reference Panel on Clinical Services Transformation
10. Ottawa Hospital Patients' Reference Panel on Clinical Services Transformation
9. Hamilton Citizens’ Reference Panel on Cultural Policy and Planning
9. Hamilton Citizens’ Reference Panel on Cultural Policy and Planning
8. Halton Region Citizens’ Reference Panel on Strategic Priorities
8. Halton Region Citizens’ Reference Panel on Strategic Priorities
7. Champlain LHIN Citizens’ Advisory Panel on Clinical Hospital Services Distribution Plan
7. Champlain LHIN Citizens’ Advisory Panel on Clinical Hospital Services Distribution Plan
6. Northumberland Hills Hospital Citizens’ Advisory Panel on Health Service Prioritization
6. Northumberland Hills Hospital Citizens’ Advisory Panel on Health Service Prioritization
5. Ontario Youth Matter Youth Advisory Council
5. Ontario Youth Matter Youth Advisory Council
4. Mississauga-Halton LHIN Citizens’ Reference Panel on Regional Health Priorities
4. Mississauga-Halton LHIN Citizens’ Reference Panel on Regional Health Priorities
3. Central LHIN Citizens’ Reference Panel on Regional Health Priorities
3. Central LHIN Citizens’ Reference Panel on Regional Health Priorities
2. South-East LHIN Citizens’ Reference Panel on Regional Health Priorities
2. South-East LHIN Citizens’ Reference Panel on Regional Health Priorities
1. South-East LHIN Citizens’ Regional Health Assembly
1. South-East LHIN Citizens’ Regional Health Assembly
33. Toronto Planning Review Panel II
33. Toronto Planning Review Panel IIThe City of Toronto Planning Department commissioned MASS to convene a second iteration of the Toronto Planning Review Panel in 2018 and 2019. This standing panel is made up of a representative sample of 32 randomly selected residents from across Toronto who will meet 16 times over two years. TPRP gives guidance on City planning initiatives, offering their recommendations on behalf of the public as a whole. At the beginning of 2018, the Panel met for a series of orientation meetings to learn about city planning and set principles and priorities to inform their work together. The Panel meets with City staff and other organizations working on city planning initiatives, and produces a public report of recommendations after every meeting. The Toronto Planning Review Panel is the only example in Canada of a standing residents panel advising a municipal government. It provides a representative, community-centric voice to the Planning Division to complement the work of other advisory bodies like the Design Review Panel, which is comprised of experts.Client: City of TorontoYear: 2017Civic Lottery packages mailed: 15,000Download the Reports | Visit the website
32. Toronto Pearson Residents’ Reference Panel on Airport Growth and Noise Fairness
32. Toronto Pearson Residents’ Reference Panel on Airport Growth and Noise FairnessMASS was commissioned by the Greater Toronto Airports Authority to convene a Residents’ Reference Panel to provide advice from citizens on airport growth and noise fairness. The 36 panelists were randomly selected to sit on the Panel, with a number of panelists selected from communities highly affected by airport noise. The Panel met four times over the course of 2017. Panelists heard from a range of experts about airport operations, organizational roles and responsibilities, and economic impacts. Panelists also heard from community groups about noise issues in their communities. MASS and available Panel members hosted four public workshops across the Greater Toronto Hamilton Area, to understand each community's concerns and ideas about noise fairness and respite. The panel produced a final report containing a series of principles, values, issues, and recommendations to guide responsible airport growth and approaches to noise sharing. The recommendations in the Panel’s final report were used by the GTAA to inform Growing Responsibly: 2018-2022 Noise Management Action Plan.MASS also conducted a series of stakeholder interviews that preceded the Residents’ Reference Panel to inform the panel curriculum and identify issues for Panel discussion. MASS also conducted a Noise Fairness Survey that was open to all GTHA residents online, and sent to randomly selected households alongside Reference Panel invitation letters. The survey played two roles: it helped the project team better understand community priorities and motivations, and helped panelists understand community perspectives. Findings from this survey were shared with the Panel to inform their recommendations on noise fairness and respite.Client: Greater Toronto Airports AuthorityYear: 2017Civic Lottery packages mailed: 20,000Download the Report | Visit the website
31. Metrolinx Residents’ Reference Panel on the Regional Transportation Plan
31. Metrolinx Residents’ Reference Panel on the Regional Transportation PlanMetrolinx commissioned MASS to assemble a reference panel to provide advice from residents about the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan. The 36-member panel was made up of volunteers from across the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA). Members of the Panel met five times between March and May 2017, including once for a tour of transportation facilities important to the regional network. The Panel heard from a range of transportation experts about the opportunities and challenges of transportation planning and regional integration in the GTHA. The Panel report was presented to the Board of Directors of Metrolinx, and helped Metrolinx draft the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan. The draft Regional Transportation Plan was then presented during a series of six roundtable meetings hosted in communities across the GTHA. After incorporating feedback from these community roundtable meetings and other consultations with partners and planners from the GTHA municipalities, the Regional Transportation Plan was released in early 2018.Client: MetrolinxYear: 2017Civic Lottery packages mailed: 10,000Download the Report | Visit the website
30. Duncan-North Cowichan Citizens’ Assembly on Municipal Amalgamation
30. Duncan-North Cowichan Citizens’ Assembly on Municipal AmalgamationMASS LBP was commissioned by the Municipalities of Duncan and North Cowichan to convene an assembly to evaluate the case for amalgamating the two communities. The Assembly was tasked with learning about the needs and interests of local residents, examining the implications of creating an amalgamated municipal structure, and advising local Councillors and their administrations on whether and one under what the conditions the Municipalities should proceed. A representative panel of thirty-six members was selected at random across the two municipalities. The Assembly met six times during two phases over four months. The Assembly also hosted two public roundtable meetings, where more than one hundred residents shared their issues, concerns, and advice for the Assembly.During the first phase, the Assembly learned about the Municipalities’ history, geography, local government, and relations with local First Nations communities. The Assembly learned about other amalgamations and heard from those with an understanding of local government and the region’s healthcare and business sector. The Assembly produced an Interim Report that included issues and questions to be addressed in the second phase of the project. During the break, independent technical consultants completed a study of the municipalities’ finances, infrastructure, and services. They also responded to questions raised in the Interim Report. During the second phase, the Assembly heard from technical consultants on the projected financial outcomes of a potential amalgamation. The Assembly heard from additional experts and stakeholders, including the general manager of the Cowichan Tribes First Nation, on the implications of amalgamation. In their Final Report, the Assembly recommended amalgamation of the two municipalities. The final report was presented to the Mayors of Duncan and North Cowichan, the Chief of Cowichan Tribes First Nation, and a Joint Council Committee Member.Client: The City of Duncan and Municipality of North CowichanYear: 2017Civic Lottery packages mailed: 10,000Download the Report | Visit the website
29. City of Lethbridge Citizens’ Assembly on Councillor Employment and Compensation
29. City of Lethbridge Citizens’ Assembly on Councillor Employment and CompensationLethbridge City Council commissioned MASS to convene a panel of 36 randomly-selected Lethbridge citizens to understand the roles and responsibilities of elected Councillors and to recommend whether their positions should be part-time or full-time and what they should be paid. The panel met over three Saturdays and participated in a public round table meeting. Panelists learned about the work and responsibilities of municipal government, its role as a provider of human services and infrastructure, and the election process of Councillors. Panelists also learned about other municipal government structures and compensation structures in similarly-sized cities in Western Canada. The panel’s final report included a set of values that should be held by their Councillors, along with a set of recommendations concerning Councillor employment and compensation.Client: Lethbridge City CouncilYear: 2016Civic Lottery packages mailed: 5,000Download the Report | Visit the website
28. Citizens’ Reference Panel on Pharmacare in Canada
28. Citizens’ Reference Panel on Pharmacare in CanadaIn October 2016, MASS convened its second national reference panel, bringing together 35 randomly-selected Canadians to consider whether there are models that could help improve access to prescription drugs in Canada. The Panel was selected to be broadly representative of the demographics of the country, as well as to approximately represent the proportion of Canadians who are covered by any form of public or private prescription drug insurance, and for the amount spent out of pocket for prescription drugs in a year. The panel met over five days in Ottawa. They learned from a roster of 20 speakers, including academics, clinicians, policymakers, pharmacists, industry representatives, and patient representatives. They then deliberated about the different prescription drug coverage systems that exist in Canada and in other countries, and drafted their recommendations for what they believe would be a system that better serves the needs of all Canadians. On Dec 6, 2016, the Chair and one member of the Panel were invited to present the final report to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health.Lead Funding: Canadian Institutes of Health ResearchYear: 2016Civic Lottery packages mailed: 10,000Read the Report in English or French | Visit the website
27. St. Michael’s Hospital: Residents Health Services Panel
27. St. Michael’s Hospital: Residents Health Services PanelSt. Michael’s Hospital commissioned MASS to convene a randomly selected group of residents from across central-east Toronto to help St. Michael’s improve the local health services available in their catchment area. The panel matched the demographic profile of central-east Toronto, and it also balanced participation based on whether or not panelists had ever been patients of the hospital. The panel met four times in early 2016 to learn, deliberate, set priorities for improving local health services, and produce their first report. They will meet another four times this year to advise the hospital on specific initiatives being developed to improve local health services. To date, MASS has designed and led the first four sessions, during which the panel learned about the health care system and the diverse needs of local area residents.Client: St. Michael’s Hospital    Year: 2016Civic Lottery packages mailed: 14,500
26. St. Michael’s Hospital: Academic Family Health Team Patient Design Session
26. St. Michael’s Hospital: Academic Family Health Team Patient Design SessionSt. Michael’s Hospital: Academic Family Health Team commissioned MASS to convene a randomly selected group of residents from their active patient roster to help them improve the process and experience of a medical appointment. This was the first time a Civic Lottery was conducted using email as the recruitment tool. MASS wrote and designed two rounds of recruitment emails that were sent to 10,000 patients that the Academic Family Health Team randomly selected from their roster. 350 of these patients volunteered, and 36 of these were randomly selected and convened for a one-day session. The panel matched the demographic profile of the Family Health Team’s catchment area and included proxy selection criteria for income level. The panelists learned about the Family Health Team’s role within the health care system and about the patient appointment process from St. Michael’s staff members. The panel then developed a report detailing the problems and recommendations for each step of the appointment process. Two panelists then presented and explained the motivations behind the final recommendations to the larger Family Health Team organization several weeks after the panel was convened. Client: St. Michael’s Hospital: Academic Family Health TeamYear: 2016Civic Lottery invitations emailed: two rounds of 10,000 emails
25. Toronto Planning Review Panel
25. Toronto Planning Review PanelThe City of Toronto Planning Department commissioned MASS to convene a randomly selected group of residents from across Toronto to provide guidance concerning ongoing planning initiatives. The panel closely matched the demographic profile of city residents, and also matched the rough proportion of homeowners and renters. The panel met 12 times in 2016-2017 before a new group of panelists was selected for a new two-year term. To prepare them for their role, MASS developed and led four orientation sessions, where the panel learned about urban planning and the issues and pressures that affect planning decisions. Together the panel members produced a directions document outlining their core values and priorities. They also refined and adopted the Terms of Reference document that will govern the panel.Client: City of Toronto Year: 2015Civic Lottery packages mailed: 12,000Download the report | Visit the website
24. Calgary Commission on Municipal Infrastructure
24. Calgary Commission on Municipal InfrastructureThe Calgary Chamber in partnership with the City of Calgary commissioned MASS to convene a reference panel to review and propose revisions to the City's fiscal model. The 36 randomly-selected representative Calgary residents met during six Saturdays over a three month period. They also hosted a public roundtable meeting which all Calgary residents was encouraged to attend. The panel members learned about Calgary's future infrastructure needs and its sources of revenue, before reviewing fiscal models from other jurisdictions and evaluating more than 25 different revenue tool. The panel produced a report describing its values and a series of 14 funding recommendations to ensure sustainable infrastructure investment by the City. Client: Calgary Chamber & the City of CalgaryYear: 2015Civic Lottery packages mailed: 10,000Visit the website
23. The Citizens’ Reference Panel on the Mental Health Action Plan for Canada
23. The Citizens’ Reference Panel on the Mental Health Action Plan for CanadaThe Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) commissioned MASS to convene the first ever national Citizens’ Reference Panel, made up of 36 randomly-selected Canadians from across the country. The panel worked in both official languages and heard from more than twenty recognized mental health leaders as well as those with lived experience. Panel members were tasked with learning about the mental health needs of Canadians, how mental illness is treated across Canada, understanding the priorities of different communities, and working together to recommend actions for inclusion in the Mental Health Action Plan for Canada. The Panel met for five full days in Ottawa, where they completed an intensive learning and deliberation process. Their comprehensive final report detailed six guiding principles, four major themes, and six directions containing 30 recommendations. The report will be used to shape MHCC’s next strategic plan, due out in the spring of 2016. Client: Mental Health Commission of Canada     Year: 2015Civic Lottery packages mailed: 10,000Read the Panel's Report in English or French | Visit MHCC's website  
22. Metrolinx Residents’ Reference Panel on the Davenport Community Rail Overpass
22. Metrolinx Residents’ Reference Panel on the Davenport Community Rail OverpassMetrolinx commissioned MASS to assemble a reference panel to help inform the design process of a rail overpass in the Toronto community of Davenport. MASS randomly selected a representative group of 36 local residents, who met over four Saturdays and one evening. The panel was tasked with learning about transportation planning and processes, weighing design options and approaches, and proposing a set of values, priorities, and detailed recommendations. The 30 general recommendations and 59 site-specific recommendations in their final report will strongly influence the design and delivery of the Davenport Community Rail Overpass project.Client: Metrolinx    Year: 2015   Civic Lottery packages mailed: 10,000Download the report  
21. Halton Region Citizens’ Reference Panel on Strategic Priorities
21. Halton Region Citizens’ Reference Panel on Strategic PrioritiesFollowing on the success of their 2010 reference panel, Halton Region commissioned MASS to develop a new reference panel to inform its 2015-2019 Strategic Action Plan. This time, MASS worked with senior staff to develop a twin process that reached hundreds of Halton Region employees, before inviting 36 local residents to review the Region's work and process additional directions. Together, panellists agreed upon a set of guiding values and shared priorities, which they used as a guide while they reviewed, refined, and commented on the 150 proposed actions of the Draft Strategic Plan. The program also featured a well-attended public roundtable and culminated with a half-day working session with elected members of Council.Client: Halton Region     Year: 2015Civic Lottery packages mailed: 10,000Download the report
20. Grandview-Woodland Citizens’ Assembly
20. Grandview-Woodland Citizens’ AssemblyThe City of Vancouver commissioned MASS to convene a Citizens' Assembly to inform the development of a new 30-year Community Plan for Grandview-Woodland, a Vancouver neighbourhood. It was essential that all members of the community had the opportunity to volunteer to participate.  19,000 civic lottery packages were issued. These packages were delivered to every household, and were also available for pick-up in local community centres.  48 individuals were randomly-selected to sit on the Assembly, which met over eleven full-day sessions and three evening public meetings over the course of 8 months. Members also had the opportunity to attend ten community walks. We estimate that each member of the panel contributed at least 100 hours of time to the process.Ultimately, the Assembly issued its report containing more than 200 neighbourhood-wide and sub-area recommendations.  The City's draft plan which builds on these recommendations is due this spring.Client: City of Vancouver     Year: 2015Civic Lottery packages mailed: 19,000Download the report | Visit the website
19. St. Joseph’s Health Centre Community Reference Panel
19. St. Joseph’s Health Centre Community Reference PanelSt. Joseph's Health Centre (SJHC) commissioned MASS to convene a panel of 36 randomly-selected residents from the health centre’s catchment area. The panel was taken through a two-stage process. In stage one, they learned about SJHC and different health care models from a range of staff, experts, and patients. Then they create a set of values and priorities for the hospital, which they checked with other residents at a public roundtable meeting. They also created a series of recommendations and priorities to help inform the health centre’s strategic plan. In stage two, the panelists were introduced to SJHC's  draft strategic plan developed by the health centre’s senior management team. They reviewed each of the plan’s recommendations, weighing them against the panel’s values and priorities, and provided further feedback and suggestions on how to improve the draft plan. The final report was used to inform the final version of the strategic plan, ensuring that it was aligned with the priorities of the broader community.Client: St. Joseph’s Health Centre     Year: 2015Civic Lottery packages mailed: 10,000Download the report
18. Residents’ Reference Panel on Supervised Injection Services
18. Residents’ Reference Panel on Supervised Injection ServicesWest Neighbourhood House (formerly St Christopher House) and the Toronto Central LHIN commissioned MASS to convene a residents' reference panel to address the issue of supervised injection services in the city. 36 panelists were randomly selected from the LHIN’s catchment areas. They were tasked with learning about the impacts of injection drug use in Toronto and how these impacts are currently addressed; understanding the different perspectives of Toronto residents concerning the location and operation of potential locations in the city; and proposing recommendations to government on actions and guidelines for addressing public concern. The panel met for four full Saturdays and produced a consultation road map to assess proposals for SIS locations and suggested recommendations responding to five broad concerns about these service locations.Client: West Neighbourhood House & Toronto Central LHIN     Year: 2014Civic Lottery packages mailed: 16,500Download the report 
17. BC Services Card User Panel on Digital Services
17. BC Services Card User Panel on Digital ServicesThe Government of British Columbia commissioned MASS to convene a reference panel to create recommendations for the province’s new digital services plan, which included a new, chip-enabled Services Card. MASS randomly selected a representative group of 36 B.C. residents, who met in Vancouver over the course of two weekends to help shape the province's approach to digital services.The panel received and reviewed input from stakeholders, experts, and the public. From what they learned, they developed principles for the design and implementation of digital services, as well as recommended guidelines and actions to ensure citizens' confidence in the Services Card. The panel's final report proposed a series of guiding values, design suggestions, confident-building measures, and recommendations for digital service priorities.Client: Province of British Columbia     Year: 2013Civic Lottery packages mailed: 16,500Download the report
16. Metrolinx Regional Residents’ Reference Panel on Transportation Investment
16. Metrolinx Regional Residents’ Reference Panel on Transportation InvestmentMetrolinx commissioned MASS to implement a three-pronged engagement strategy, including running a reference panel, developing and distributing a comprehensive 'conversation kit,' and hosting 16 roundtable meetings across the region.The reference panel acted as the anchor for the wider engagement strategy. MASS randomly selected a representative group of 36 residents from across the Greater Toronto Hamilton Area (GTHA). The panel was tasked with learning about the existing transit systems in the GTHA, proposed additions to the transit system, transportation systems around the world, and the variety of funding tools available for transit investment. They also worked together to understand the transportation needs and priorities of residents from across the region. Finally, they created recommendations to inform Metrolinx's strategy for raising funds to make long-term, sustainable investments in transit and transportation in the area. Client: Metrolinx     Year: 2013Civic Lottery packages mailed: 10,000Download the report
15. Ontario Ministry of Consumer Services Reference Panel on the Condominium Act
15. Ontario Ministry of Consumer Services Reference Panel on the Condominium ActThe Ontario Ministry of Consumer Services worked with MASS to convene a residents' reference panel to create recommendations for updating the Condominium Act. MASS randomly selected a representative group of 36 condominium owners and renters from across province — the first time we targeted a specific subset of the wider population.The panel was tasked with learning  about Ontario’s condominiums and the diverse concerns of residents and other stakeholders. They gained an understanding of the collective challenges the condo sector faces, and considered the choices ahead. Finally, they offered guidance and proposed priorities to the Government of Ontario for amending the Act. The panelists developed a list of guiding values and a series of recommendations across six core themes: financial management, governance, manager qualifications, consumer protection, dispute resolution, and a group of other non-thematized recommendations. The final panel report was used to inform the new Condominium Act of 2015Client: Province of Ontario     Year: 2012Civic Lottery packages mailed: 10,000Download the report 
14. Calgary Arts Development Citizens’ Reference Panel
14. Calgary Arts Development Citizens’ Reference PanelThe Calgary Arts Development Association commissioned MASS to convene a special residents reference panel to determine the future of art, art funding, and the city's involvement in artistic communities in Calgary. MASS randomly selected a representative group of 36 residents from across the City of Calgary. The group met for four full weekends to learn about the ‘state of the arts’ in Calgary and propose their own recommendations to inform the City’s Arts Plan. Together, panel members produced and agreed to 35 recommendations, organized under seven themes. The recommendations informed the final phase of the city's arts planning process.Client: Calgary Arts Development Authority     Year: 2012Civic Lottery packages mailed: 5,000Download the report
13. Toronto Residents’ Reference Panel on Household Income
13. Toronto Residents’ Reference Panel on Household IncomeDiaspora Dialogues commissioned MASS to hold a reference panel to learn about income inequality within Toronto and to create recommendations for combating it. Using our Civic Lottery process, we randomly selected a representative group of 44 Torontonians —one from each city ward— who met over three full Saturdays. The panel learned about the growing income gap and considered the choices necessary to ensure that Toronto remains a competitive, liveable, and inclusive city. They created a set of 97 recommendations, covering transit; taxation, the economy, and employment; community development and services; health; immigration, diversity, and culture; housing; and education and equity.This was the first randomly selected panel focused on policies and issues affecting the City of Toronto.Client: Diaspora Dialogues / Metcalf Foundation     Year: 2011Civic Lottery packages mailed: 7,500Download the report
12. Citizens’ Reference Panel on Ontario Health Services
12. Citizens’ Reference Panel on Ontario Health ServicesThe global consulting firm Price Waterhouse Coopers (PwC) commissioned MASS to assemble a reference panel to learn about health care issues in Ontario and to develop a series of health care priorities. MASS randomly selected a representative group of 28 residents from across the province, who met over three full weekends in Toronto. MASS also created an Advisory Board to help ensure that the curriculum and program were durable and unbiased.In their meetings, the panel first learned about the health system, care models, sustainability, and other health care policy themes. Then, they worked together to identify a set of shared values to guide their work. Through a series of facilitated activities, the panel moved from broad issues to more specific priorities for the health care system. Finally, guided by these priorities, the panelists created a series of recommendations.This was a first time the Civic Lottery and Citizens' Reference Panel were used to convene a group of representative residents from across the province of Ontario.Client: Price Waterhouse Coopers     Year: 2011Civic Lottery packages mailed: 10,000Download the report
11. TCHC Tenant Communications Strategy & Tenants’ Reference Panel
11. TCHC Tenant Communications Strategy & Tenants’ Reference PanelThe Toronto Community Housing Corporation (TCHC) commissioned a MASS reference panel to ask residents how it could improve the way it communicates with them. We randomly selected 28 representative residents, who gathered to learn about the current state of TCHC communications and to suggest how TCHC could improve two-way communications. This was the first time TCHC, or, to our knowledge, any other community housing organization used a randomly-selected group of tenants as a method of engaging with its residents.Client: Toronto Community Housing Corporation     Year: 2011Civic Lottery packages mailed: 7,500Download the report
10. Ottawa Hospital Patients' Reference Panel on Clinical Services Transformation
10. Ottawa Hospital Patients' Reference Panel on Clinical Services TransformationThe Ottawa Hospital commissioned MASS to assemble a reference panel to guide changes to its cancer treatment program. MASS randomly selected 36 patients and family members of patients who had received care through the hospital cancer program. Over the course of three Saturdays, panellists shared their experience of the cancer program and learned from the experiences of others, developed a set of guiding values and a vision for patient- and family-centred care, and identified major issues affecting the patient and family experience during the different stages of cancer care. Finally, the panel provided advice on how the hospital could make their cancer program more patient- and family-centred, and drafted a report to the hospital to guide the next phase of the Cancer Program Transformation Project.Client: The Ottawa Hospital     Year: 2011Civic Lottery packages mailed: 15,000Download the report
9. Hamilton Citizens’ Reference Panel on Cultural Policy and Planning
9. Hamilton Citizens’ Reference Panel on Cultural Policy and PlanningThe City of Hamilton commissioned MASS to assemble a reference panel to inform its new cultural plan. MASS convened 30 randomly-selected, demographically representative residents from within the city. Over the course of three Saturdays, the panellists were tasked with reviewing the City's findings from the first phase of the project, learning about cultural policy and planning from experts, and developing a series of recommendations to inform Hamilton's next cultural plan. Client: City of Hamilton    Year: 2011Civic Lottery packages mailed: 5,000Download the report
8. Halton Region Citizens’ Reference Panel on Strategic Priorities
8. Halton Region Citizens’ Reference Panel on Strategic PrioritiesThe Regional Municipality of Halton commissioned MASS to assemble a reference panel to help inform its four-year strategic work plan. MASS randomly selected a representative group of 36 local residents, who met over five Saturdays. First, the panel learned about the services and programs offered by the Region and challenges Halton would be facing in the coming years. Then, they worked together to identify common values and priorities. These in turn informed the recommendations the panel ultimately made to inform the strategic work plan that would guide the Halton Regional Council's development over the next four years.This was a first time the Civic Lottery and Citizens' Reference Panel were used in a municipal setting. Client: The Regional Municipality of Halton    Year: 2011Civic Lottery packages mailed: 10,000Download the report 
7. Champlain LHIN Citizens’ Advisory Panel on Clinical Hospital Services Distribution Plan
7. Champlain LHIN Citizens’ Advisory Panel on Clinical Hospital Services Distribution PlanFaced with new pressures and the need to consider new service models, the Champlain Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) commissioned a MASS reference panel. We gathered 24 randomly-selected residents, and, in a first for MASS, we facilitated the panel in both French and English to ensure that everyone could participate fully. The reference panel met over three full Saturdays to learn about the region's health system challenges and to recommend possible models for redistributing services among the Eastern Counties’ hospitals.Client: Champlain Local Health Integration Network     Year: 2010Civic Lottery packages mailed: 5,000Download the report
6. Northumberland Hills Hospital Citizens’ Advisory Panel on Health Service Prioritization
6. Northumberland Hills Hospital Citizens’ Advisory Panel on Health Service PrioritizationNorthumberland Hills Hospital in Cobourg, Ontario commissioned MASS to gather a randomly-selected, representative group of 28 people from their community to sit on the Citizens’ Advisory Panel on Health Service Prioritization. The Panel was tasked with developing recommendations to mitigate the hospital's operating deficits and better prioritize health services allocation. Clinical and non-clinical community members worked together to develop recommendations that would cut costs and preserve important local health services. The project later was praised in the legislature by the Minister of Health and Long-term Care and became a Canadian Institutes of Health Research case study.Client: Northumberland Hills Hospital    Year: 2009Civic Lottery packages mailed: 5,000Download the report 
5. Ontario Youth Matter Youth Advisory Council
5. Ontario Youth Matter Youth Advisory CouncilThe Laidlaw Foundation supports young people to be fully engaged in their communities. In 2010, they commissioned MASS to assemble a reference panel of randomly-selected Ontarians aged 16 to 24. This council met over two days to learn about current youth policies and to propose recommendations for better involving young Ontarians in public policy making.Client: Laidlaw Foundation     Year: 2010Civic Lottery packages mailed: 5,000
4. Mississauga-Halton LHIN Citizens’ Reference Panel on Regional Health Priorities
4. Mississauga-Halton LHIN Citizens’ Reference Panel on Regional Health PrioritiesThe Mississauga-Halton Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) commissioned a reference panel to propose recommendations for their integrated health service plan. MASS gathered a group of 36 demographically representative residents, who learned about health trends and issues in the LHIN over two Saturdays. They then deliberated on these issues, and drafted a series of recommendations.Client: Mississauga-Halton LHIN     Year: 2009Civic Lottery packages mailed: 5,000Download the report
3. Central LHIN Citizens’ Reference Panel on Regional Health Priorities
3. Central LHIN Citizens’ Reference Panel on Regional Health PrioritiesFollowing the success of our South-East LHIN projects, the Central Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) invited MASS to develop a Reference Panel to help shape its own integrated health service plan. MASS randomly selected a group of 36 demographically representative residents, who gathered over several Saturdays to learn about health trends and issues from the LHIN. The panelists heard from health care experts, researchers, and frontline staff. Panelists then developed set of values and priorities, which were used to guide their work in creating a series of recommendations for the LHIN’s integrated health service plan.Client: Central Local Health Integration Network     Year: 2009Civic Lottery packages mailed: 5,000
2. South-East LHIN Citizens’ Reference Panel on Regional Health Priorities
2. South-East LHIN Citizens’ Reference Panel on Regional Health PrioritiesFollowing the success of our first project, the South East Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) commissioned MASS to select a new group of residents from across the region to weigh in on the LHIN’s integrated health service plan, which sets out the priorities for meeting the health needs of the local population. MASS convened 36 representative volunteers over the course of three Saturdays to learn about health trends in the LHIN and to create a series of recommendations for the LHIN's first integrated health service plan.Client: South-East Local Health Integration Network     Year: 2009Civic Lottery packages mailed: 5,000Download the report
1. South-East LHIN Citizens’ Regional Health Assembly
1. South-East LHIN Citizens’ Regional Health AssemblyThe Citizens' Regional Health Assembly was our inaugural project. We randomly selected 54 residents from across the area covered by Ontario’s South East Local Health Integration Network (LHIN). Together, the members spent a long and very snowy weekend at Kingston's magnificent City Hall and — auspiciously — the site of the united Province of Canada's first parliament. Together they hosted a public meeting and developed a long-term visions for improving health care and health outcomes for the South East LHIN.Client: South-East Local Health Integration Network    Year: 2008Civic Lottery packages mailed: 5,000
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